Tagged: prosecution

Supreme Court Hears Oral Argument in Already LLC v. Nike, Inc. 0

Supreme Court Hears Oral Argument in Already LLC v. Nike, Inc.

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in the case of Already, LLC d/b/a Yums v. Nike, Inc. As we reported previously, that case arose from an appeal of the Second Circuit’s decision affirming the Southern District of New York’s holding that a covenant not to sue entered in a trademark dispute ended the case and controversy between the parties. We enclose the full transcript of the oral argument.

Already v. Nike:  Petitioner’s Brief Asserts that Jurisdiction Remains Despite Covenant Not to Sue 0

Already v. Nike: Petitioner’s Brief Asserts that Jurisdiction Remains Despite Covenant Not to Sue

In a prior blog, we reported that the Supreme Court had granted certiorari in Already, LLC dba Yums v. Nike, Inc., No. 11-982, to an appeal from the Second Circuit’s decision affirming the Southern District of New York’s holding that a covenant not to sue entered in a trademark dispute ended the case and controversy between the parties.

CAVEAT EMPTOR! – USPTO Issues Warning on Misleading Third Party Communications 0

CAVEAT EMPTOR! – USPTO Issues Warning on Misleading Third Party Communications

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) has issued a warning notice advising trademark owners to beware of third party communications that “mimic the look of official government documents” and request payment of fees. That notice was issued after a number of owners reported to the USPTO that they had made payments in response to such requests, believing that they were for official fees and then learned that they were not.

The Hatch Waxman Act and Induced Infringement 0

The Hatch Waxman Act and Induced Infringement

Oral argument was recently heard before the Federal Circuit in the appeal of AstraZeneca Pharms. LP. v. Aurobindo Pharma Ltd. AstraZeneca, along with IPR Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and The Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Inc., (“Plaintiffs) sued ten generic drug companies alleging infringement of US Patent Nos. 6,858,618 (“the ‘618 patent”) and 7,030,152 (“the ‘152 patent”) under the Hatch-Waxman Act. These patents claim methods of treatment using rosuvastatin calcium, which Plaintiffs market as Crestor®.

Would Combining References Change the Outcome of In re Klein? 0

Would Combining References Change the Outcome of In re Klein?

In the recent In re Klein decision, the Federal Circuit reversed the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences’ decision because five separate obviousness rejections were not based on analogous art as compared to the claimed invention. In re Klein, 647 F.3d 1343, 1345 (Fed. Cir. 2011). The claimed invention was a device for preparing sugar-water nectar for various species comprised of a vessel having a movable partition capable of separating water and sugar until it was desired to mix them. Id. at 1345-46. The partition could be inserted into the vessel at different tracks so that, when filled to a predetermined level, a nectar of the desired concentration of sugar would result from mixing the contents. Id. at 1350-51.

The Value Of Pharmaceutical Method Claims 0

The Value Of Pharmaceutical Method Claims

The Federal Circuit’s Myriad Genetics decision, Ass’n for Molecular Pathology v. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, 99 U.S.P.Q. 2d 1938 (Fed. Cir. 2011), which invalidated most of the method claims in the patents at issue, brings to mind a concern about the value of method claims, particularly to the pharmaceutical industry. The Myriad Genetics patents at issue included two types of method claims relating to human genetics: one involved determining whether a female patient had abnormal BRCA1/2 genes by comparison of BRCA1/2 gene and BRCA 1/2 RNA from the patient’s tumor sample to those from a non-tumor sample; the second was an activity screening method for anticancer drugs that compared the growth of a host cell transformed with a cancer-causing BRCA gene in the presence and absence, respectively, of the test compound.

Patent Reform Act of 2011 on the Horizon 0

Patent Reform Act of 2011 on the Horizon

On Tuesday, September 6, 2011, the Senate invoked cloture on H.R. 1249, also known as the America Invents Act, making it almost a done deal for passage of this Act. One reason that this bill has succeeded over its predecessors is that, with one major exception, there is little difference between the House and Senate versions. The passage of H.R. 1249 will mark the culmination of a 6-year process to pass patent reform legislation that started with H.R. 2795

Direct Infringement Liability May Be Possible Without Possession of All the Claimed Elements 0

Direct Infringement Liability May Be Possible Without Possession of All the Claimed Elements

Following a recent Federal Circuit decision, a patentee might now be able to assert a system claim against a single infringer for operating a distributed system, rather than naming joint infringers hosting portions of the distributed system. This is significant for entities that do business on-line, particularly enterprises with a cloud computing business model. Whereas in the past a patentee may have had to allege direct infringement among joint infringers (e.g., individual users, enterprises, and information technology system providers), and perhaps prove vicarious liability, now it may be possible to bring a direct infringement action against a sole infringer that might not be in possession of the complete system. E-commerce businesses, web-based providers of business services, providers of software as a service, electronic market makers, and other enterprises that use third-party server farms to host part, or all, of their system might now be named as the sole infringer. A patentee could perhaps now sue a competitor for infringement without having to sue the infringer’s IT provider. This could be particularly advantageous in cases where the patentee and the infringer share providers, and will permit the patentee to sue without jeopardizing its own business relationship with the provider.