Tagged: Litigation

Color Trademarks Remain in Fashion:  Second Circuit Sides with Louboutin 0

Color Trademarks Remain in Fashion: Second Circuit Sides with Louboutin

Earlier today, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit issued its long-awaited decision in Christian Louboutin S.A. v. Yves Saint Laurent America Holding, Inc.. The Appellate Court decision reversed the lower court’s finding that a single color can never serve as a trademark for fashion. It also found that Louboutin’s red, lacquered shoe outsole had acquired distinctiveness and is protectable as a trademark. However, the Court went on to state that the trademark is “limited to uses where the red outsole contrasts with the color of the remainder of the shoe.” The case has now been remanded to the District Court for further proceedings.

Norman IP v. Lexmark: Post AIA Joinder and the Rule 42 Trump Card 0

Norman IP v. Lexmark: Post AIA Joinder and the Rule 42 Trump Card

In Norman IP Holdings, LLC v. Lexmark Int’l, Inc., a recent Eastern District of Texas decision, Chief District Judge Leonard Davis provided guidance on the application of Fed. R. Civ. P. 20 (“Rule 20”) joinder and Fed. R. Civ. P. 42 (“Rule 42”) consolidation in patent infringement cases post-enactment of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (“AIA”). Norman IP brought suit against Lexmark and others on September 15, 2011, one day before the AIA was signed into law. Norman IP later added an additional 23 defendants. The defendants filed a motion to dismiss for improper joinder or to sever, and Norman IP alternatively requested that any severed cases be consolidated under Rule 42. The Court granted defendants’ motion to sever and issued an order consolidating the cases for pretrial issues excluding venue.

Already v. Nike:  Petitioner’s Brief Asserts that Jurisdiction Remains Despite Covenant Not to Sue 0

Already v. Nike: Petitioner’s Brief Asserts that Jurisdiction Remains Despite Covenant Not to Sue

In a prior blog, we reported that the Supreme Court had granted certiorari in Already, LLC dba Yums v. Nike, Inc., No. 11-982, to an appeal from the Second Circuit’s decision affirming the Southern District of New York’s holding that a covenant not to sue entered in a trademark dispute ended the case and controversy between the parties.

Intellectual Asset Management Ranks Gibbons Among Top IP Law Firms and Practitioners Worldwide 0

Intellectual Asset Management Ranks Gibbons Among Top IP Law Firms and Practitioners Worldwide

Intellectual Asset Management (IAM) ranks Gibbons among the top IP law firms and practitioners worldwide in its guide – IAM Patent Litigation 1000 – The World’s Leading Patent Litigators. David E. De Lorenzi, Chair of the Gibbons Intellectual Property Department, and Sheila F. McShane, a Director in the Department, were two of only five intellectual property lawyers featured as leading individuals in this practice.

USPTO Offers IP Awareness Assessment 0

USPTO Offers IP Awareness Assessment

Under the joint auspices of the US Patent and Trademark Office the National Institute of Standards and Technology/Manufacturing Extension Partnership, the IP Awareness Assessment is now in the beta stage and available for businesses and inventors to assess their intellectual property awareness. Dubbed “A business and inventor’s IP education tool,” this web-based offering is designed to assess IP knowledge and provide personalized training resources for businesses and inventors.

The Hatch Waxman Act and Induced Infringement 0

The Hatch Waxman Act and Induced Infringement

Oral argument was recently heard before the Federal Circuit in the appeal of AstraZeneca Pharms. LP. v. Aurobindo Pharma Ltd. AstraZeneca, along with IPR Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and The Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Inc., (“Plaintiffs) sued ten generic drug companies alleging infringement of US Patent Nos. 6,858,618 (“the ‘618 patent”) and 7,030,152 (“the ‘152 patent”) under the Hatch-Waxman Act. These patents claim methods of treatment using rosuvastatin calcium, which Plaintiffs market as Crestor®.

Gibbons Intellectual Property Department Attains National and Metropolitan Rankings in 2012 Best Lawyers 0

Gibbons Intellectual Property Department Attains National and Metropolitan Rankings in 2012 Best Lawyers

Gibbons P.C. is proud to announce that two practices within its Intellectual Property Department have achieved national and metropolitan rankings in the 2012 edition of Best Lawyers®, the oldest and most respected peer-review publication in the legal profession. In addition, Department Chair David E. De Lorenzi has been individually ranked in three different IP categories.

Increased Patent Litigation in the District of Delaware? 0

Increased Patent Litigation in the District of Delaware?

Following last month’s enactment of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act (“AIA”), significant limitations on multidefendant infringement suits are now in effect. Specifically, the joinder provision of the AIA, 35 U.S.C. § 299, permits accused infringers to be joined in one action only if any right to relief is asserted against the parties jointly, severally, or arising out of the same transactions or occurrences; and, common questions of fact as to all defendants will arise in the case. Simply put, patentees can no longer sue multiple defendants in the same litigation based solely on allegations that they each have infringed the patent(s)- in-suit.

The Patent Pilot Program Takes Off Around the Country 0

The Patent Pilot Program Takes Off Around the Country

Patent litigation has some eccentricities that, some say, require special attention in the court system. One historical effort to address this was the creation of the Federal Circuit in 1982 and the exclusive jurisdiction it possesses to hear patent litigation appeals from all district courts around the nation. This exclusive jurisdiction based on subject matter and not geographic location is fairly unique in the judicial system. Patent litigation often involves complex technical issues to determine patent invalidity and infringement, unique procedural devices (e.g. Markman hearings), and intricate legal issues with technical and economic underpinnings (inequitable conduct, price erosion, lost profits, etc.). For these reasons, patent litigants often prefer to have an experienced judge hear and manage the dispute so that the fairest outcome is had. To address and analyze these and other issues, on January 4, 2011, Congress created the “Patent Pilot Program.”