The Trademark Rush Continues: HARBOWL and KAEPERNICK …. 0

The Trademark Rush Continues: HARBOWL and KAEPERNICK ….

The upcoming Super Bowl, pitting San Francisco 49ers Head Coach Jim Harbaugh against his older brother, Baltimore Ravens Head Coach John Harbaugh, has been dubbed “Harbowl” by some. An individual in Rockville, Maryland is attempting to take this name to a new level, by filing a federal trademark application for use of the mark “HarBowl” on athletic apparel.

U.S. Supreme Court Will Not Review Lead Compound Test for Obviousness Analysis 0

U.S. Supreme Court Will Not Review Lead Compound Test for Obviousness Analysis

On Monday, the Supreme Court denied the petition for writ of certiorari filed by Apotex seeking review of the Federal Circuit’s May 7, 2012, ruling that affirmed the District Court of New Jersey’s judgment that Otsuka’s patents covering its blockbuster drug Abilify© are valid and not obvious. In that ruling, the Federal Circuit found no error in the District Court’s application of the so-called lead compound test; an analytical framework in chemical art cases that seeks — in an obviousness inquiry under 35 U.S.C. § 103 — to determine whether a POSA (“person of ordinary skill in the art”) would select the proffered prior art as a “lead compound.” Specifically, in a lead compound analysis, the Court will consider: the hypothetical person of skill in the art’s identification of a lead compound, structural differences between the proposed lead compound and the claimed invention, motivation or teachings in the prior art to make the necessary changes to arrive at the claimed invention, and whether the person of skill in the art would have a reasonable expectation of success in making such structural changes.

AIA Technical Corrections Bill and Trade Secret Penalties Bill Await President’s Signature 0

AIA Technical Corrections Bill and Trade Secret Penalties Bill Await President’s Signature

As most Americans focused on the Congressional efforts to avoid the “fiscal cliff,” IP practitioners noted that Congress passed Senate-amended versions of a bill to amend the Smith-Leahy America Invents Act (AIA) (H.R. 6621) and a bill to increase penalties under the Economic Espionage Act (EEA)(H.R. 6029) on to the White House on January 1, 2013, for signature by President Obama. It is expected that President Obama will sign both bills into law shortly.

DNJ Rejects Double-Patenting Claim 0

DNJ Rejects Double-Patenting Claim

Last week, in Gilead Sciences, Inc. v. Natco Pharma Ltd., the District of New Jersey ruled on summary judgment that Gilead Sciences did not unlawfully extend its patent protection on oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a neuraminidase inhibitor used to treat the flu, covered by U.S. Patent No. 5,763,483 (“the ‘483 patent”). Natco Pharma sought to invalidate the ‘483 patent for obviousness-type double patenting in its attempt to market a generic version of Tamiflu prior to the patent’s expiration. Natco had alleged, inter alia, that the claims of the ‘483 patent were invalid due to obviousness-type double-patenting over Gilead’s later issued U.S. Patent No. 5,952,375 (“the ‘375 patent”).

Supreme Court to Examine Pay-For-Delay Settlements 0

Supreme Court to Examine Pay-For-Delay Settlements

The battle between the pharmaceutical industry and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) over so-called “pay-for-delay” settlements will finally be examined and decided by the Supreme Court. Last Friday, the Court granted certiorari in Federal Trade Commission v. Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc., one of two cases with filed certiorari petitions involving Hatch Waxman reverse payment settlements. The petition in the other case, In re K-Dur Antitrust Litigation, is still pending.

New Jersey Superior Court Finds the Recently-Enacted New Jersey Trade Secrets Act Does Not Preempt Common Law Claims 0

New Jersey Superior Court Finds the Recently-Enacted New Jersey Trade Secrets Act Does Not Preempt Common Law Claims

In an opinion dated December 7, 2012, a New Jersey Superior Court judge in Bergen County considered an issue of first impression relating to the recently-enacted New Jersey Trade Secrets Act (“NJTSA”). In SCS Healthcare Marketing LLC v. Allergan USA Inc. et al., defendant Allergan sought to dismiss numerous common law claims brought by plaintiff SCS, arguing that SCS’s statutory claim for misappropriation of trade secrets under the NJTSA preempted its common law claims. SCS filed suit alleging that Allergan misappropriated marketing contractors’ trade secrets relating to a proprietary technology portal. Specifically, SCS alleges that Allergan revealed its proprietary and confidential information to a rival health care marketing company, thereby violating state laws relating to unfair competition, disclosure and trade secrets.

Supreme Court Takes on Myriad 0

Supreme Court Takes on Myriad

As anticipated, the Supreme Court has granted certiorari in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, et al. (the “Myriad” case) to review the Circuit Court’s opinion. The Court previously granted certiorari to vacate and remand the Federal Circuit’s Myriad decision for reconsideration in view of the Court’s 2012 decision in Mayo Collaborative Services, et al. v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc. (“Mayo”). Notwithstanding Mayo, the Federal Circuit reached the same result on remand as its initial decision.

Freelancer of “Live to Ride” Logo and Harley-Davidson Settle Their Dispute 0

Freelancer of “Live to Ride” Logo and Harley-Davidson Settle Their Dispute

Closing the loop on our previous report, freelance commercial artist Wayne W. Peterson and the Harley-Davidson motorcycle company have reached a confidential settlement in their copyright spat. Peterson had alleged that the iconic motorcycle maker stole his copyrighted “Live to Ride” logo, created in 1985 and the “Harley-Davidson University” logo, created in 1991.

FTC Petitions for Certiorari in Reverse Payments Dispute 0

FTC Petitions for Certiorari in Reverse Payments Dispute

As we anticipated, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) filed a petition for certiorari yesterday with the Supreme Court in FTC v. Watson Pharmaceuticals, Inc. In that case, the Eleventh Circuit upheld reverse payments (payments made by branded pharmaceutical patent holders to generic challengers to postpone market entry under the scope-of-the-patent approach, i.e., as long as the anti-competitive effects fall within the scope of the exclusionary potential of the patent, absent sham litigation or fraud), as lawful. The Second and Federal Circuits follow that approach. In contrast, the Third Circuit has held that such payments are presumptively anti-competitive under the “quick look rule of reason analysis” that may be rebutted by showing that the payments was for something other than delay or that the payment has a competitive benefit, and thereby increases competition.

Will the Supreme Court Weigh in on Reverse Payments in ANDA Cases — Revisited 0

Will the Supreme Court Weigh in on Reverse Payments in ANDA Cases — Revisited

We have written previously on numerous developments concerning reverse payments in Hatch-Waxman litigation settlements (i.e., payments made by branded pharmaceutical patent holders to generic challengers to postpone market entry of proposed generic products). Earlier this month, we reported that Merck & Co. had filed a petition for a Writ of Certiorari seeking to challenge the Third Circuit’s decision in In re K-Dur Antitrust Litig. holding that reverse payments are prima facie evidence of an antitrust violation.