IP Law Alert

IP Law Alert

Practical Perspectives on Intellectual Property Legal Developments

Category Archives: USPTO

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McDonald’s Triumphs over BioMcDiesel

Posted in Trademark, USPTO
On July 14, 2014, the United States Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (TTAB) found the trademark “BioMcDiesel” for biodiesel fuel likely to cause confusion with McDonald’s Corporation’s (“McDonald’s”) famous family of MC-formative trademarks. McDonald’s Corporation v. Joel D. Joseph, Opposition No. 91194117 (July 14, 2014) [not precedential]. The applicant, Joel Joseph, appeared pro se to defend his application, which was based on intent to use. McDonald’s challenged the application on three bases under the Lanham Act, namely, likelihood of confusion under Section 2(d), dilution under Sections 13 and 43(c), and on the basis that Mr. Joseph filed the application in bad faith, in that he lacked a bona fide intent to use the mark and solely filed the application for the purpose of selling or licensing the mark to McDonald’s. The TTAB’s decision addressed only the likelihood of confusion claim, and found the “BioMcDiesel” mark was not entitled to registration… Continue Reading

PTAB Roundtables Coming to a City Near You

Posted in Patent, USPTO
On March 25, 2014, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) announced that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) would be hosting roundtables across the country to educate the public, and collect feedback regarding the new America Invents Act (AIA) trial proceedings. These roundtables are free and open to the public. According to Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director of the USPTO, Michelle Lee, “[t]hese roundtables are a part of USPTO’s ongoing efforts to provide more opportunities for the public and other key stakeholders to share ideas, feedback, experiences and insights on additional ways we can improve our processes.”… Continue Reading

IP Practitioners — Get Ready for the Global Patent Prosecution Highway!

Posted in USPTO
Recently, in an effort to expedite patent prosecution internationally, thirteen countries, including the United States, have established a Global Patent Prosecution Highway ("GPPH"): Australia (IP), Canada (CIPO), Denmark (DKPTO), Finland (NBPR), Japan (JPO), Korea (KIPO), Nordic Patent Institute (NPI), Norwegian Patent Office (NIPO), Portugal (INPI), Russia (ROSPATENT), Spain (SPTO), United Kingdom (IPO), and USA (USPTO). Unfortunately, the European Patent Office has not signed on to the GPPH yet… Continue Reading

Limitations on Discovery in Inter Partes Review Proceedings

Posted in Patent, USPTO
Companies accused of patent infringement have a number of basic alternatives to contemplate: settle the matter; defend the suit; or consider resort to a post grant patent proceeding at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). With an eye towards cost, risk and accurate resolution, inter partes review (IPR) proceedings are an attractive alternative to settling or defending… Continue Reading

Cooperative Patent Classification System Underway to Streamline Prior Art Searching

Posted in USPTO
As we previously reported, the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and the European Patent Office (EPO) jointly launched the Cooperative Patent Classification System (CPC) with the aim of producing a common classification system for technical documents and the promise of transparent and harmonized global classification for patent documents… Continue Reading

The USPTO Sets Up Two Additional Pro Bono Assistance Programs in California and D.C.

Posted in USPTO
Upon the passage of the America Invents Act ("AIA") and in an effort to help individuals and corporations who are unable to afford legal advice relating to intellectual property, the USPTO has recently announced two additional pro bono assistance programs in California and the District of Columbia. With the addition of these two programs, the USPTO has created four intellectual property pro bono programs across the United States and is forecasting an additional ten by the end of … Continue Reading

USPTO Extends Deadline for Commenting on First Inventor to File Provisions of the AIA to November 5, 2012

Posted in Patent, USPTO
On July 26, 2012, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) published a notice of proposed rulemaking and a notice of proposed examination guidelines to implement the first-inventor-to-file (FITF) provisions of the AIA effective March 16, 2013. The notices set an initial comment deadline date of October 5, 2012. In response to requests for additional time to submit comments, the USPTO recently extended the comment deadline date to November 5, … Continue Reading

Patent Classification Harmonization

Posted in USPTO
The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) and the European Patent Office (EPO) jointly launched the Cooperative Patent Classification System (CPC) and released a finalized set of CPC definitions. The CPC is operational at both the EPO and USPTO. The USPTO and EPO developed the CPC with the collaborative aim of producing a common classification system for technical documents. The CPC brings the promise of transparent and harmonized global classification for patent documents… Continue Reading

Inter Partes Review Under AIA is Underway …

Posted in Patent, USPTO
As we previously discussed, the new inter partes review (IPR) procedures went into effect September 16, 2012, along with several other significant changes. The IPR procedure replaces the previous inter partes reexamination and applies to any patent issued before, during, or after September 16, 2012. This removes one of the hurdles of the previous inter partes reexamination which applied only to applications filed after November 29, 1999. The PTO will only accept a valid IPR petition nine months after a patent issues. As in inter partes reexamination, the IPR permits the petitioner to challenge claims as being anticipated or obvious in view of published prior art references. Also, like the previous inter partes reexamination, IPR carries with it an estoppel effect barring the IPR petitioner from asserting the invalidity of any challenged claim on the same arguments and references in any district court action… Continue Reading

Implementation of USPTO Rules Under the AIA is Underway: Preissuance Submissions

Posted in Patent, USPTO
35 U.S.C. § 122(e), adopted last fall as part of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act ("AIA"), conditions third party submissions to the USPTO for consideration and inclusion in an application file. Recently, the USPTO published the final rules regulating these submissions by third parties: Changes to Implement the Preissuance Submissions by Third Parties Provision of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, 77 Fed. Reg. 42150 (2012). That is to say, the USPTO provided the requirements and guidance to anyone wishing to have the Office consider patents, published patent applications, or other printed publications of potential relevance during the examination of a pending application. The new rules pave the way for a third party to limit the scope of a pending patent application, particularly a competitor's application, in a meaningful way… Continue Reading

USPTO to Expand Its Regional Office Program

Posted in USPTO
On July 2, 2012, the United States Patent and Trademark Office announced that it will be expanding its regional office program to include Dallas, Texas, Denver, Colorado and San Jose, California. The first regional office, the Elijah J. McCoy United States Patent and Trademark Office, in Detroit, Michigan, is scheduled to open on July 13 of this year. Section 23 of the America Invents Act required the USPTO to establish at least 3 additional satellite offices by September … Continue Reading

CAVEAT EMPTOR! – USPTO Issues Warning on Misleading Third Party Communications

Posted in Trademark, USPTO
The United States Patent and Trademark Office ("USPTO") has issued a warning notice advising trademark owners to beware of third party communications that "mimic the look of official government documents" and request payment of fees. That notice was issued after a number of owners reported to the USPTO that they had made payments in response to such requests, believing that they were for official fees and then learned that they were not… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Affirms Kappos v. Hyatt, Paving the Way for New Evidence and Expansive Review of Patent Applications

Posted in Patent, USPTO
Yesterday, in a unanimous decision, Kappos v. Hyatt, the Supreme Court affirmed a ruling of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit holding that in a civil action under 35 U.S.C. § 145, a patent applicant has the right to present new evidence to the District Court regardless of whether that evidence previously was or could have been presented during the proceedings before the PTO. Further, when such new evidence is presented, the District Court must review any related factual conclusions affected by the new evidence de novo, without giving deference to any prior decision or finding of the … Continue Reading

IP Law 2012: A Look Ahead . . . .

Posted in Patent, Pharmaceuticals, Trademark, USPTO
Coming off a year that included the Smith-Leahy "America Invents Act," 2012 portends to have some significant developments in IP law. Decisions for IP practitioners and industry to watch for include: the Supreme Court's decision in Caraco Pharm. Labs. Ltd. v. Novo Nordisk A/S, regarding "use codes" and section viii carve-outs under the Hatch-Waxman Act; the Supreme Court's decision in Mayo v. Prometheus, regarding patentable subject matter, post-Bilski; and the Federal Circuit's upcoming en banc decisions in McKesson and Akamai, regarding joint infringement liability… Continue Reading

Patent Reform Act of 2011 on the Horizon

Posted in Biotech, Patent, Pharmaceuticals, USPTO
On Tuesday, September 6, 2011, the Senate invoked cloture on H.R. 1249, also known as the America Invents Act, making it almost a done deal for passage of this Act. One reason that this bill has succeeded over its predecessors is that, with one major exception, there is little difference between the House and Senate versions. The passage of H.R. 1249 will mark the culmination of a 6-year process to pass patent reform legislation that started with H.R. … Continue Reading

Gibbons Institute Presents, “The Future of America’s Innovation Economy,” Event Featuring David Kappos & Q. Todd Dickinson – February 23, 2011

Posted in USPTO
The Gibbons Institute of Law, Science & Technology, Seton Hall University School of Law, and New Jersey Intellectual Property Law Association present, "The Future of America's Innovation Economy - Progress and Challenges at the USPTO," event featuring David Kappos, Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Director of the USPTO, and Q. Todd Dickinson, Former Director of the USPTO and the current Executive Director of the AIPLA. This event will be held at Gibbons Newark office (One Gateway Center, 21st floor) on Wednesday, February 23, at 4:00 pm. CLE credits for New York and New Jersey will be offered, with pending approval for Pennsylvania credits. The cost to attend this event is $25 and includes CLE credits, food and beverage… Continue Reading

New Patent Quality Examination Metrics Attempt Greater Balance

Posted in Patent, USPTO
On October 7, 2010, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) issued a press release announcing the adoption of new procedures for measuring the quality of patent examination that will be implemented during the start of the 2011 fiscal year. After requesting public comment in both the Federal Register and Official Gazette and holding two round table discussions, a joint USPTO-Patent Public Advisory Committee (PPAC) Task Force developed a new composite quality metric including seven factors, and an associated procedure for obtaining measurements, identifying systemic problems and providing remediation through examiner training… Continue Reading

Former Judge Paul Michel Discusses Proposed Changes to US Patent System

Posted in Patent, USPTO
"Congress Needs to Act" is the first article published by Judge Paul R. Michel since his retirement from the Federal Circuit, where he served as the Chief Judge. Judge Michel's below speech was given on July 21, 2010, at the Global Intellectual Property Center of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, providing commentary on the current state of the nation's patent system and how the system can be improved to bolster US economic growth… Continue Reading

USPTO Recognizes That One Size Does Not Fit All

Posted in USPTO
The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), in an attempt to offer patent applicants more choices, recently proposed establishing a three-tiered examination system. Under the current system, with the exception of accelerated examination and those cases granted "special" status, all non-provisional patent applications go into the same queue for examination and are taken up in due course. Under the new proposal, an applicant would be able to choose either prioritized examination (Tier I), traditional examination (Tier II) or delayed examination (Tier III)… Continue Reading

12-Month Extension to the Provisional Patent Application Period – Buying More Time to Commercialize Your Invention

Posted in Patent, USPTO
On April 2, 2010, the USPTO issued a press release and published in the Federal Register a request for comment on a proposed change that would effectively give applicants a 12-month extension to the current provisional application period. Under the current rules, an applicant must file a nonprovisional application within 12-months after the filing of a provisional application pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) and must thereafter complete any missing parts to that application within a time period of up to a maximum of seven months… Continue Reading

Duty of Disclosure: Applicant’s Contradictory Statements to EPO and USPTO Support Finding of Inequitable Conduct

Posted in Patent, USPTO
The Federal Circuit's recent decision in Therasense, Inc. v. Becton, Dickinson & Co., No. 2008-1511 (Fed. Cir. Jan. 25, 2010) held that applicant's statements made in proceedings before foreign patent offices may be required disclosures in prosecution before the USPTO ("PTO"), particularly when those statements directly contradict other statements made during prosecution. From the court's holding: "An applicant's earlier statements about prior art, especially one's own prior art, are material to the PTO when those statements directly contradict the applicant's position regarding that prior art in the PTO."… Continue Reading

USPTO and Practitioners Discuss Disclosures from Similar Applications

Posted in Patent, USPTO
During a recent AIPLA-sponsored discussion at the USPTO, patent practitioners met with heads of various Technology Centers to discuss USPTO caseloads and recent events. One of the more interesting topics was the increasing number of disclosures from applicants in light of McKesson and more recent inequitable conduct cases and measures that may be taken by the USPTO and practitioners in response… Continue Reading
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